‘Molecular drink printer’ claims to make anything from iced coffee to cocktails


A company called Cana has revealed what it calls the world’s first “molecular drink printer”. The idea is that using a single flavor cartridge, the machine can blend any of thousands of different beverages, including juices, soft drinks, iced coffee, sports drinks, wine and cocktails.

With Cana One, which is designed to sit on a kitchen counter, you’ll be able to select a drink from a wide range of drink types and brands using a touch screen. You can customize alcohol, caffeine and sugar levels (alcoholic and caffeinated drinks can be locked behind a PIN code). Cana has partnered with beverage brands around the world and created its own concoctions.

A team of scientists spent three years studying popular drinks at the molecular level, Cana says. Researchers have apparently isolated the trace compounds behind flavor and aroma, and used them to create a set of ingredients that can provide a wide variety of drinks.

cana

The system uses “new microfluidic liquid dispensing technology” to mix drinks. Cana says that at least 90% of what we drink is water with added flavorings, sugar and alcohol.

The company says Cana One can reduce waste and associated emissions by helping people avoid bottled and canned drinks. Cana also says it can reduce wasted water needed to grow ingredients for things like orange juice and wine.

cana will automatically replace ingredient cartridges (each expected to last about a month) as needed, free of charge. However, you will pay for device concoctions per drink. Each will cost between 29 cents and $3, though Cana says the average price will be lower than bottled drinks at retailers. The system also requires sugar and spirit cartridges – both of which are replaced automatically – and a CO2 cylinder.

cana one

cana

It remains to be seen how well the company’s claims hold up in practice, although you can book a Cana One now. You will have to pay $99, which is a refundable credit on the total price. Cana One will cost $499 for the first 10,000 orders, rising to $799 thereafter. The company plans to start shipping the machine in early 2023.

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